Color coding reveals biases – Waatea News: Māori Radio Station

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Young Maori and ethnic minorities who are not perceived as pākehā or “white” are more likely to experience racial discrimination in Aotearoa, a new study published in the international medical journal Lancet has found.

Young Maori and ethnic minority youth who are not perceived as pākehā or “white” are more likely to experience racial discrimination in Aotearoa, a new study published in the international medical journal Lancet has found.

University of Auckland researchers Rachel Simon-Kumar and Roshini Peiris-John and Sonia Lewycka, from the University of Oxford, analyzed the responses of around 7,700 students aged 13 to 17 who were surveyed in 2019 as part of a long Youth 2000 study.

Dr Simon-Kumar says skin shade bias is worryingly persistent in society, and educational interventions and diversity training for teachers, health workers and police are essential to combat these prejudices.

Overall, Maori and ethnic minority students experienced more discrimination than Pākehā students, but Maori and ethnic minority students perceived as white reported less discrimination than those who were not perceived as white


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