Kiwis are learning the lesson of DIY lockdown when it comes to staying safe at home

New Zealanders are more likely to be injured at home than anywhere else (file photo).

Kelly Hodel / Stuff

New Zealanders are more likely to be injured at home than anywhere else (file photo).

Curbing your DIY ambitions around the house could help you avoid injuries this summer.

ACC figures show New Zealanders are more likely to be injured at home than anywhere else.

The Crown entity paid more than one million claims in 2020 for home injuries – a five-year high that cost the state $1.4 billion.

And while Kiwis have been forced to spend long periods at home over the past two years due to Covid-19 restrictions, it looks like more of us are just going our own way during the 2021 lockdowns. .

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“We looked at injuries during the lockdown period in 2021 and there was actually a reduction in injuries, including those at home,” said ACC injury prevention program manager James Whitaker.

“Maybe people weren’t so used to being at home [in 2020] then people got used to it in 2021.

One in five New Zealanders are injured around the house each year, according to the ACC.

THING

One in five New Zealanders are injured around the house each year, according to the ACC.

“By the time people had been locked down for a second or third time, all those aspirations to do a lot of DIY… they might have disappeared [on] the back burner, and they decided to spend time with their family instead and relax.

In Waikato, for example, 111,403 home injury claims were accepted in 2020, at a cost of $144 million – the highest annual payout in five years.

Yet the increase in injuries sustained around the home in 2020 has not translated into increased admissions to hospital emergency departments nationwide.

The clinical director of Waikato Hospital’s emergency department, Dr Ian Martin, said the number of admissions had dropped significantly over the past two years of closure. Nationally, emergency departments have seen a 30-40% drop in admissions during the shutdowns.

The ACC says 90% of injuries sustained at home are preventable (file photo).

Kelly Hodel / Stuff

The ACC says 90% of injuries sustained at home are preventable (file photo).

“Because people weren’t going out on their mountain bikes, jet skis, kayaks…presentations at ED dropped quite significantly during the shutdowns and that’s what we’ve seen across the country” , said Martin.

A home injury study shows that different age groups are more prone to injury under certain circumstances.

New Zealanders aged 60 to 69 are the most likely to be injured in the garden, with back injuries topping the list. Older Kiwis are also increasingly injuring themselves while cycling.

Over the past four years, the ACC has seen a 101% increase in cycling-related injuries involving people over the age of 65.

“Cycling is one of the things people are allowed to do…even in the highest levels of Covid it’s [also] the popularity of e-bikes and the fact that people over 65 are quite active,” Whitaker said.

People between the ages of 30 and 39 are most likely to be injured lifting or carrying a heavy load at home (file photo).

Kelly Hodel / Stuff

People between the ages of 30 and 39 are most likely to be injured lifting or carrying a heavy load at home (file photo).

However, young people aged nine and under are the most likely to be injured by falling or being knocked down at home. They are also the age group most likely to experience animal bites and scratches and injuries in the kitchen.

Modeling how to behave in the kitchen will help keep youngsters safe and also reinforce good cooking habits in adults, Whitaker said.

“You’ll also be less likely to hurt yourself because you’ll remember, enjoy that moment of reflection, and follow the right way of doing things.”

People between the ages of 50 and 59 are more likely to injure themselves doing twisting movements, while those between the ages of 30 and 39 are more likely to injure themselves when lifting or carrying something.

Martin said people should always make sure to protect their head, which means wearing a helmet while cycling.

“They say no one over 30 should climb a ladder, and no one under 30 should climb one either,” he said.

“Ladders pose a high risk and we constantly see injuries with them. People do stupid things on the scales, and we can’t fall that far.

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